About

                                           Who is Nōnen Títi?

Nōnen Títi was born and raised in The Netherlands, has lived and worked in the UK, the USA and Australia, before coming to New Zealand and settling with her family in Wellington.

After a career in mental and physical healthcare and midwifery, she devoted almost twenty years to the study of the personality theories associated with Carl Jung. She also trained as a Montessori teacher and finished her BA in philosophy at Otago University in 2009, after which she continued to study and write as an independent philosopher.

She published her first novel in 2008, and writes both fiction and non-fiction books inspired by the inborn differences that influence the beliefs, behaviour and natural talents of every person.

 

For more information, please visit http://www.nonentiti.com

 

But who is Nōnen Títi really?

Nōnen Títi is a penname, chosen to represent all the people in the world who at times feel lost, alone or misunderstood as one single person between millions of others – in other words, a non-entity.

My fictional characters all represent real people with real personalities. And like all real people, these personalities are complex and they have a dark side. I use the phrase, Portraying Human Nature Where Psychology Cannot, because psychology is a theoretical topic that by its very nature is designed to categorize and classify people under certain headings. Fiction can go beyond those classifications and portray the complexities that are the result, not only of a person’s inborn personality type, but also of the environmental influences he has lived with since he was born. For that reason do many of my stories have an underlying theme that may not be immediately apparent to a reader. You need to get to know the characters as you would real people.

And I am fascinated by the complexities and the ‘darker’ side of human nature – and let’s not deceive ourselves: every human being has a dark side – it gives depth to our existence and allows for our never-ending creativity and inventiveness. In fact, would human beings be no more than the caricatures portrayed in much of today’s popular fiction or the superficial moral and intellectual characters classified by academics, our race would have never reached the ‘sophistication’ it has today.

But don’t worry, acknowledging the darker side of human nature is not accepting doom and gloom. On the contrary, by not expecting an idealized image of what people should be like (whether the superhero or the moral ‘prince’), I do not get disappointed about their behaviour and therefore don’t have to resort to escapism or labelling those aspects of human behaviour we do not like with labels such as “disorder” or “amoral”.

My logo carries the words writing for a positive future. With that I mean that I hope to initiate social change with my writing. I realize that I cannot achieve such change on my own, but I am trying to help set the ball rolling. There are a number of complex and serious problems in our society – problems that may have disastrous consequences if not dealt with – that require a change in our global mindset in order to solve them.

For example, the young people in our society are growing up with the message that their future will be dominated with global warming disasters, an ice age, severe weather events, more terrorism, over population, psychopath shootings, asteroids and super volcanoes, you name it, all in name of “freedom of the media”, “the benefits of the information technology” and “the technical advancement and understanding of science”. No wonder the young people are choosing vampire stories over realistic novels – the reality we present them with is one of doom and gloom.

In Lohland , I address the issue of global warming and not only give young readers an idea of what is already being done to help humans live with the rising waters, but also show how they can become involved in working for that future.

My other books deal in a similar manner with other topics of social interest, which I will discuss at a later time.

Behind the penname

I chose to write under a penname for several reasons. Firstly, because I believe that books should be read for their content and not for the profile of the author. And secondly, because I do express social views not everybody may agree with and I didn’t want the name of my family members connected to those.

Therefore I introduce myself as Nōnen Títi to those I communicate with as a writer. But that does not mean that I have a problem explaining to my readers a little more about who I am and why I write what I do. Besides, after my initial attempt to keep my penname separate from my personal life, I found that this has become impossible with the internet.

Why write at all?

You could ask, why, if everybody can talk to other people much easier using Facebook and Twitter, do people still need to write books?

But that is similar to asking why, if everybody can download pictures from the internet, do people still choose to paint, or when everybody can share their recordings on YouTube, do people still choose to become musicians.

The answer lies in the psychology of people; their need to create and express themselves and to share that expression with others. However, not every human being expresses in the same manner and through the same medium so that some people are natural born painters, others are natural born musicians and some are natural  born writers – they are writers by nature; they cannot live without pen and paper nearby – yet not all writers are interested in the same topic. Luckily, neither are readers.

I did not start as a writer. I enrolled in nursing training because I was tired of high school. The training was very comprehensive so that I gained experience and a licence to work in general medicine, geriatrics, paediatrics, community health, the care of mentally challenged individuals and psychiatrics.

After graduating, I worked in most of these fields, but mental healthcare fascinated me more. I also spent four years as a specialist diabetic nurse and head nurse at Camp NYDA and had a brief period with Médécins sans Frontieres in Columbia after the 1985 eruption of the Nevado del Ruiz.

After my first child was born I trained and worked as a midwife, but once I had two children, I decided to leave the irregular hours of healthcare and trained as a Montessori teacher instead. From there it was a small step to homeschooling my daughters.

All these experiences gave me plenty of material to write about, but even if I had written stories my entire life, I did not start trying to get published until 2006.

An independent writer

Contrary to the common belief, there are downsides to being a writer today, exactly because it is so easy to produce a book using all the new technologies. Additionally, every university is offering courses in “creative writing” to cater for the endless students that need a university degree, but have no idea what to study.

As a result of this, today’s market is overflowing with new books, while the average reader and publisher are overwhelmed with choices. Publishers get too many manuscripts to even look at, so they dismiss most of them based on the name of the author or the topic alone (without opening the manuscript), claiming the benefits of market research, while reviewers accept only books  with the “right credentials”, which the book sellers then provide to the mainstream market.

The decision to self-publish was not a hard one, since my topics and viewpoints are not mainstream or popular, but it isn’t always easy.

Despite getting a lot of support from my printer, it still involved having to do my own editing, and a writer is not a proof reader – they each have a different personality and therefore a different strength – so that the books, despite twenty or so drafts, still have some stylistic and grammatical mistakes I now regret. My first book has since had a second edition for that reason.

Not only the editing, but also the marketing is a huge problem for independent writers. Aside from the technical skills needed to reach an audience and the money needed to advertise in the first place, a writer tends to be of a personality that does not spend a great amount of time on social contacts (since that leaves no time for writing).

Nevertheless, I am a motivated independent writer: I won’t let my topic be influenced by financial considerations, won’t adjust my style to the latest fashion in writing techniques and won’t limit my stance to the visions of political, religious or cultural groups.

All my books are available in print from most internet book stores, from The Copy Press or direct from the author. And all books are available as eBooks both for kindle and other readers directly from meBooks or from Amazon.

Thank you for reading,

Nōnen Títi

5 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. nigaud
    Nov 01, 2012 @ 07:41:40

    Dear Mirjam, I hope the whether is treating you well in Netherlands. In America East Coast we went through an ordeal since Monday. Forced to stay home, had the chance to read thoroughly your posts and came up a tabular engendered with other classifications. I did corporate your classification SNJP to better understand the MBTI and found it is quite helpful for my understanding. I write this to ask for your permission to permanently use your ideas classification (love the Abuse of personality disorders). Many thanks in advance, will let you know when I post my tabular to the WordPress. Warm Regards, Chris

    Reply

    • nonentiti
      Nov 01, 2012 @ 12:04:45

      Hi Chris, beware that the letters I used are those used by those who use the theories of Jung, Myers-Briggs and David Keirsey and are not my classifications by definition. My theory is an adaptation to this classification to incorporate the theories together in light of a philosophical theory, the book of which has not yet been published. So, I don’t mind if you refer to my descriptions and in reference to this blog post so that it can remain in context, because this is only an extract and to quote it directly would confuse matters until my book is published.

      Reply

  2. nigaud
    Nov 04, 2012 @ 07:54:34

    Thanks nonentity, best wishes to your endeavor. The study on MBTI is more complex than I thought, been playing with database and excel to display it. Keep in touch 🙂

    Reply

  3. muriellerites
    May 10, 2013 @ 23:04:17

    i honour your passion and commitment. Thanks for following.
    Namasté

    Reply

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